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20130113
20130121
STATION
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
CSPAN 1
MSNBC 1
WETA 1
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, he said he would not extend any of the bush tax cuts for the wealthy and you did. you say you're not going to negotiate this year, why should house republicans take that seriously and think if we did into the 1 minute until midnight scenario that you will not back down? >> first of all, julianna, let's take the example of this year's fiscal cliff. i did not say we would not have any conversations out all about extending the bush tax cuts. i said we would not extend them for the wealthy. we did not. now, you can argue that during the campaign i said i set the criteria for "wealthy" at $250 on dollars and we ended up being a $400,000, but millionaires are paying more taxes, just as i said. from the start, my concern was making sure we had a tax code that was fair and protected the middle class. when biggest priority is making sure that middle-class taxes did not go up. the difference between this year and 2011 is the fact that we have already made $2 trillion in cuts. at the time, i indicated that there were cuts that we could sensibly make that would not damage our economy, wou
about now closing more loopholes and that means higher taxes. we don't know on who, but he would not specify any specific spending reductions and refusing to negotiate with the house republicans on the issue of the debt ceiling. lou, an interesting couple of months. looking forward to it. >> megyn: all right. thank you, sir. >> thanks, megyn. >> megyn: with the president refuse to go negotiate on that debt ceiling, it's coming and we're going to hit it and there's going to be a real question what we will do. he negotiated the last time and suddenly says he doesn't want to negotiate anymore and the republicans have drawn a line in the sand when it comes to these spending cuts, saying, if we don't see a dollar for dollar spending cut in the amount you want to raise the debt ceiling, there's no deal. what kind of progress can we hope for here? our political panel debates that coming up in our next hour. now to another big debate playing out in washington over the obama administration's efforts to overhaul the nation's gun laws. we heard some of that this morning. here is the preside
be in the form of tax cuts. a lot of democrats are going to hate that, but republicans like tax cuts, and we can just get everybody on board from the beginning." >> narrator: he was told right from the start the stakes couldn't be higher. >> this is the first of a series of tests. and if he failed this one, what would it say for his administration and his ability to deal with all the other challenges we're going to face? >> president obama promised the american people he would bring bipartisan solutions... >> narrator: he decided to make a symbolic gesture: he'd come to them. >> mr. obama is hoping for support from both sides of the aisle... >> narrator: take his proposal to the republicans on their own turf. >> he'll try and sell his plan to the republicans... >> narrator: he headed right for the meeting of the republican caucus. >> it's a rare day when the president goes to the capitol to meet only with members of the other party... >> hello, everybody. how are you? >> he spoke extemporaneously about the stimulus. he walked us through it probably 15 or 20 minutes, just his thought process and
the aisle and got tax cuts for everyone even though the united states senate switched majority control from republicans to democrats in may of his first year in office. then he worked across the aisle to get education reform done. it can happen, but it takes a president who is willing to be presidential and really lead rather than just demand. >> eric: do you think he can take a page from george w. bush. what did you advise the president at that time and what lessons from that experience that president obama can take as he enters into his second term? >> president bush had the advantage of being a governor where he had to work with other people on the other side of the aisle. he did that successfully in texas. when he got to washington, d.c. he was committed to govern the country, not just the one that demanded change. he wanted to work with the democrats and republicans to bring change to reality. he did a pretty good job of it. very first meeting that george w. bush had at the white house with people outside were leaders of the democratic party. he brought in some of the gray beards of th
leverage, right? that was something that boehner tried to do with his whole plan "b" during the tax thing. and when he couldn't do that, then suddenly he lost all leverage. so that's the name of the game number one. and then the second part is what david was talking about there, which is they are trying to figure out how to basically move away from the debt limit as a part of this argument, and that's -- it's easier said than done. they know where they should be having this spending argument, and that is with funding the government. whether they can get the rank and file to that place is another story. and that's why the white house's strategy is go ahead and pass something. you've got that whole dollar-for-dollar spending cuts to debt limit, go ahead and give it a shot. see how you come up with it because the white house doesn't believe that boehner can pass a bill that even meets his own standard of dollar for dollar. >> and i would just add, i think the view among top republicans, republican leaders, is that the well is so poisoned by president obama. i mean, this goes beyond, you know
higher taxes for your kids to go to school? why would you sacrifice something for me to get health care? >> why would you believe if i told you i would be with you the next time? developing relations. >> not just legislative, culture. you have to know each other for a republic to work. don't have to love each other but have to feel neighborliness. >> that's a good point. look at congress. there was a time members of congress lived in washington. now, it's a three-day workweek e essenti essentially, tuesday, wednesday, thursday, they're on planes back to their districts, no matter how far away for the four-day weekend. they don't spend that much time together, don't spend that much time in washington like they used to. the old sort of image of the washington dinner party in georgetown, where decisions are made and even where friendships and bonds are created that lead to those decisions, that's kind of out-dated. >> it's the politics. the problem is it's us in the media. if they get together. this goes to mika's point about what she said about the white house and what the president was s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)